In paradoxia—sexual excitement not due to the normal physiological processes of tumescence; in anesthesia—entire absence of sexual feelings; in hyperesthesia—abnormally heightened sexual impress -ibility; and in paresthesia—either perversion or tnversion of the sexual impulse; we have a quartette of anomalies which, falling exclusively within the realm of psychopathology, always involving more or less mental disturbance, and leading quite frequently to the commission of overt, and even criminal acts, are of exceedingly great importance from a medico-legal standpoint. They are all, however, more or less fully considered in the text; and the various phases of their manifestation should be carefully studied by the jurist; particularly where sexual lust is increased, and breaks through the barriers of normal restraint, during the progress of, say, senile dementia;—quum senex Ubidinosm germanam suam filiam acmulatione motus necaret el adspeclu pectoris sciosi puellce mori-bunda deiectaretur; as Krafft-Ebing so well demonstrates in his "Text-Book of Legal Psychopathology," sec. ed., p. 161.