Successions

In cultivating and cropping of all gardens it is necessary to consider three important points. Firstly, a succession of crops must be secured so that a continuous yield of produce is obtained ; secondly, care must be taken so that the autumn and early winter operations of digging, manuring, and trenching, may be carried out; and, thirdly, provision must be made for a rotation of crops in successive years so that exhaustion of the soil is prevented. Little difficulty should be experienced in dealing correctly with each of these considerations. Here is a general guide to rotational cropping.

1. Beans and Peas should be followed by Potatoes, Turnips and Greens.

2. Potatoes, Turnips, and Greens should be followed by Onions, Parsnips, Beet, and Carrots.

3. Onions, Parsnips, Beet, and Carrots, may be followed by Beans and Peas.

This rotational arrangement may be followed out in a sectional scheme as shown in Fig. 10, or it may be worked out in the usual way by keeping a cropping plan each year, and planting crops the following season according to the table given.

For successions, viz., for the purpose of obtaining a continuous yield, the following points are useful :-

1. Peas and Beans may be followed by Lettuce or Turnips

2. Onions may be followed by Broccoli.

3. Spring Cabbage may be followed by Peas or Turnips.

4. Winter Lettuce may be followed by Cauliflower.

5. Peas or Onions may be followed by Spring Cabbage.

6. Early Potatoes may be followed by Brussels Sprouts or Peas.

The following table is a guide for planting the various crops demanded by the school plot. Local conditions will naturally affect the time of sowing ; the nature of the soil will slightly modify the depth of the drills, and all the influences of garden life will have something to do with the period that elapses before the plant arrives at maturity.

Vegetable.

When to Sow.

Depth of Drill.

Distance Apart.

Cabbage, Spring

August

inch

15 inches

Cabbage, Summer

March and April

inch

18 inches

Borecole

March to May

inch

24 inches

Brussels Sprouts

Feb. and April

inch

30 inches

Broccoli

Mar. to May

inch

18 inches

Cauliflower

Feb. to April

inch

24 inches

Savoy

March to May

inch

18 inches

Lettuce

March to July

inch

9 inches

Celery

Feb. and March

inch

9 inches

Spinach

March to Sept.

1 inch

8 inches

Beans, Broad

Feb., Mar., Nov.

3 inches

6 inches

Beans, Dwarf

May

3 inches

12 inches

Beans, Runner

May and June

3 inches

12 inches

Peas

Feb. and May

3 inches

3 to 6 inches

Beet

April and May

1 inches

9 inches

Carrots

March to July

1 inch

9 inches

Turnips

Feb. to Sept.

inch

9 inches

Parsnips

Feb. and March

1 inch

12 inches

Potatoes

March to May

4 to 6 inches

12 to 15 inches

Onions

Feb. to Ap. & Aug.

1 inch

4 to 9 inches

Leeks

March

1 inch

12 inches

Shallots

February

9 inches

Radishes

Feb. to July

1 inch

Broadcast

Vegetable Marrow

March and April

1 inch

One plant

Parsley

March to June

inch

9 inches

Tomatoes

Feb. and March

inch

24 inches

Cucumber, Ridge

March and April

1 inch

24 inches

Mustard & Cress

March to June

Surface

Broadcast

The following table indicates the crops that should be grown in each plot :-

Beet

1 Brussels Sprouts Lettuce

Potatoes

Borecole

Cabbage

Mustard and Cress

Radishes

Beans, Broad

Carrots

Onions

1 Savoy

2 Beans, Runner

Cauliflower

Parsley

Shallot

1 Broccoli

2 Celery

Parsnips

Turnips

Dwarf Beans

Peas

1 These crops should be grown on a reserve plot where the gardens are very small.

2 On small plots these crops should be omitted, or in the case of Runner Beans, a few plants may be placed at the corners.

On the nursery plot the following may be grown :- Vegetable Marrow, Ridge Cucumber, Rhubarb, and all Winter Greens.