Garden.

Memorandum, that the said Upper or Great Garden is divided into two several levels or parts by an ascent of ten steps; the lower level or part whereof adjoins to the South side of the said Manor or Mansion House, and lies level with the floor of the Hall of that Mansion House, containing in itself 4 several squares, having one fair and spacious gravelled walk, neatly ordered, running from East to West all along the said South side of the said Manor or Mansion House, being twenty-five foot broad and one hundred three score and ten yards long ; at either end of which Lower Level is one other gravelled walk running up in a regular form to the Upper or Higher Level. These three walks include within them the whole extent of the said lower level, and are comprised in the yearly value of the whole Garden.

The said Lower Level is divided and cut out into 4 great squares, the two middlemost whereof contain within them eight several squares, and well ordered knotts, stored with the roots of very many and choice flowers 5 bordered with box, well planted and ordered, in the points, angles, squares, and rountllets ; the four innermost quarters thereof being paved with Flanders bricks in the intervals, spaces, or little walks thereof; which knotts, borders, and roots of flowers, and the said Flanders bricks, we estimate to be worth 60.

Up the middle of which eight knotts, runs one walk or alley of paved stone from the hall door of the said Manor or Mansion House to the foot of the ascent of the said Higher or Upper Level ; containing in breadth 16 foot and in length 127 foot ; the stones whereof we value to be worth 20.

The said eight knotts are compassed about on three sides thereof with very handsome rails, piked with spired posts in every corner and angle, all of wood, varnished with white, [which] very much adorns and sets forth the Garden ; all along the insides of which rails grow divers Cypress trees in a very decent order, having the outsides bordered with choice and pleasant flowers ; in the two angles of which rails inwards stand two stone statues of good ornament ; which rads, spired posts, and statues we estimate to be worth 29. 8s.

In the middle of the 4 of the foresaid eight knotts which lie on the West side of the said pavement, there stands one Fountain of white marble, having a statue of Diana upon it, and a fair lead cistern belonging to it, from whence runs a channelled pavement of stone into the Birdcage, being shadowed round with twelve Cherry trees, which stand in the points and angles of those four knotts ; which fountain, statue, cistern, and channelled pavement we estimate to be worth 7.

In the middle of the 4 knotts which lie on the East side of the said pavement, there is one other Fountain of white marble, having a statue of a mermaid upon it, and a cistern of lead, being also shadowed round with twelve Cherry trees, which stand in the points and angles of those 4 knotts ; which Fountain, statue, and cistern we value to be worth 10.

The other two great squares of the said Lower Level, each of The them contains within its own square four square grass plots, with Level, one handsome round grass plot in the middle thereof, and lie at the East and West ends of the said eight knotts; in the middle of each of which four grass plots stands one fair Cypress tree. The four grass plots are bordered on all sides and angles with neat and well ordered thorn hedges, and well planted with many Cherry trees; but the value of the said two squares is not otherwise valuable than as comprised within the yearly estimate of the whole Garden.

At the west end of the gravelled alley which adjoins to the Garden South side of the said Manor House, there stands one Garden House, part of boards, part of rails, covered with blue slate, and ridged and guttered with lead, paved with square stone, having one door going into the said gravelled alley, one other door going into the end alley leading to the said Upper Level, and one other door opening into the Hartichoke Garden ; the materials of which house we value to be worth 9.

In the middle of the East wall of the said Lower Level there Shadow stands one garden, summer, or shadow house, covered with blue slate, handsomely benched and wainscoted in part, and paved with bricks, the materials whereof we value to be worth 5.

In the North side of the said alley, next adjoining to the Banquet said Manor House, and in the very end of the pale which divides House the said Lower Level from the Oringe Garden, there stands one Banqueting House, covered with blue slate, ridged and guttered with lead, having one room above, floored with boards, the door whereof opens into the said alley; and one other room below, paved with tile, the door whereof opens into the Oringe Garden ; having also in the sides thereof several lights of glass; the materials of which house we value to be worth 30.

The North side of the said alley, very near as far as the said Lower Manor House doth extend itself in length, to wit, from the East Level. end thereof to the end of the Birdcage westward, is railed with turned ballusters of free stone, well battled with stone, and cemented with lead and iron ; betwixt which rails and the said Manor House are several little grass plot courts, which lie level with the lowest rooms of the said Manor House; over the middle of which courts lies the said pavement that leads from the said Hall door to the ascent of the said Upper Level, railed with the said stone rails on each side thereof, in a very graceful manner,- in two of which courts there grow three great and fair Fig trees. Eigtrees, the branches whereof by the spreading and dilating of themselves in a very large proportion, but yet in a most decent manner, cover a very great part of the walls of the South side of the said Manor House, being a very great and munificent ornament thereunto: into which little courts there are several descents of 16 steps from the said alley; in one of which courts there is an oval cistern of lead, set about with stone, having a pipe of lead in it ; the outward walls of which little courts are planted with young Figtrees; the profits and contents of which little courts are comprised in the foresaid yearly value and admeasurement of the said Upper or Higher Garden; but we value the said oval cistern at two pounds, and the said 3 great Fig-trees and other young Fig-trees at twelve pounds ten shillings, and the said free-stone rails at, in all, 34. 10s.