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A Few Suggestions On Tree Planting | by C. S. Sargent



Every year the destruction of the American forests threatens us with new dangers. Every year renders it more imperative to provide some measures to check the evils which our predecessors in their ignorance have left us as a legacy with which to begin the second century of the Republic. It may not, then, be entirely without interest to examine briefly what the dangers are which follow the destruction of the forests, and the methods of counteracting them, which, so far as Massachusetts is concerned, arc fully within our reach.

TitleA Few Suggestions On Tree Planting
AuthorC. S. Sargent
PublisherBotanic Garden and Arboretum, Harvard University
Year1876
Copyright1876, C. S. Sargent

By C. S. Sargent, Director of the Botanic Garden and Arboretum of Harvard University.

-Directions For Planting
Larch And Pine When the nature of the soil will permit, shallow furrows four feet apart should be run one way across the field to be planted. This is best done during the autumn previous to plantin...
-General Directions For Tree-Planting
Be careful not to expose the roots of trees to the wind and sun more than is necessary during the operation of transplanting. More failures in tree-planting arise from carelessness in this particular ...
-Directions For Procuring Young Trees
Selected plants of the European larch and the Scotch pine, about one foot high and very thrifty, can be imported from England, and delivered at the railroads in Boston at from $5 to $6 @ 1,000, the pr...
-A Few Suggestions On Tree Planting
Our agricultural population is not easily convinced of the necessity of tree-planting. The benefits arc too vague, the profits too prospective, to cause them to look with enthusiasm on what seems a do...
-A Few Suggestions On Tree Planting. Part 2
A Collection of Papers on Political, Literary, and Moral Subjects. New York. 1843. Such changes of climate are everywhere noticed in countries from which the forests have been extensively removed...
-A Few Suggestions On Tree Planting. Part 3
Lupham mentions that such has been the changes in the flow of the Milwaukee River, even while the area from which it receives its supply is but partially cleared, that the proprietors of most of the...
-A Few Suggestions On Tree Planting. Part 4
By the census of 1870, of the 4,992,000 acres which constitute the State of Massachusetts, only 766,714 were reported as woodlands, or nearly 550,000 acres less than the proper amount. A comparison of...
-Larch And Scotch Pine
Larch And Scotch Pine, transplanted from the nursery in 1853, are now forty feet high, and from ten to twelve inches in diameter at one foot from the ground. Trees of the Scotch pine, raised from seed...
-The Sugar Maple, The White Elm, And The White Ash
The Sugar Maple, The White Elm, And The White Ash reach their greatest perfection in this and the neighboring States, and should be generally planted wherever the soil will permit. The product of the ...
-The White Cedar (Cupressus Thyoides, L)
The White Cedar (Cupressus Thyoides, L), although we are here on its northern limit, where it only attaius a moderate size, should be planted on account of the value of its wood for fencing and other ...
-The Finest Hickories
The Finest Hickories are not produced in Massachusetts, although in the western part of the State, especially in the valley of the Connecticut, and in other favorable situations, the natural growth of...
-The Sugar Maple (Acer Saccharinum, Wang)
The Sugar Maple (Acer Saccharinum, Wang) nowhere becomes a finer tree than in the western portions of Massachusetts; and when we consider the value of its wood in the arts, and for fuel, the value of ...
-The Common European Elm (Ulmus Campestris, L)
The Common European Elm (Ulmus Campestris, L) was introduced into Massachusetts more than a century ago. According to Dr. Shurt-leff,* Maj. Paddock, a carriage-builder by trade, and therefore probably...
-The Common European Elm (Ulmus Campestris, L). Continued
*Carpenter's and Joiner's Assistant. James Newlands. London, 1867. Less than one third of the willow used in the United States in basket-making is produced here, the remainder being imported from G...
-The European Larch
The European Larch has always been a favorite for ornamental planting here, and has shown itself well adapted to our climate. I cannot discover when this tree was first planted in Massachusetts, hut i...
-Estimated Profits Of A Plantation Of European Larch Of Ten Acres, To Last Fifty Years
Dr Ten acres of land, at 20.......... $200 00 Wire fence ....... 1,000 00 Plants, 27,200, at $5........... 136 25 Labor of planting............ 500 00 $1,836 25 Interest on i...







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