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Tree Planting On Streets And Highways | by William F. Fox









Tree Planting is one of the best expressions of altruism. The man who plants trees is thinking of others rather than himself. He enables people to gratify their love of the beautiful, to enjoy better health, to become more prosperous; he makes the world better and happier. Trees purify and cool the air, increase the value of surrounding property, and are pleasing to the eye. They should be placed along the highways, on our village and city streets, on lawns and in parks, on schoolhouse grounds, on the farm, in the dooryard, and wherever shade or shelter may be needed. Planted in commemoration of persons or events, they become living monuments that endure when the inscriptions on the yellow, moss-covered marbles of the churchyard are no longer legible.

TitleTree Planting Streets And Highways
AuthorWilliam F. Fox
PublisherForest Fish And Game Commision
Year1903
Copyright1903, William F. Fox
AmazonTree planting on streets and highways
Forest Fish And Game Commision
-Highway Planting
Trees should be set out along every road for shade. In addition, the farm lanes can be lined advantageously with fruit or nut-bearing trees that will bring money to their owner and add to the attracti...
-Highway Law
The law of 1869, which is still in force, provides that any inhabitant liable to highway tax who shall plant by the side of a public road any forest shade trees or fruit trees shall be allowed in ab...
-Selection Of Trees
Nothing has been found that will equal our American Elm and Hard Maple for wide roads and double rows. As our Elms often attain a spread of one hundred feet it is evident that the seventy feet demande...
-Street Planting
There are many reasons why trees should be planted in cities and villages. During the hot days of summer the streets which are shaded by trees are preferred to those which lack this protection. The te...
-Selection Of Spectes
In making a choice the first thine; to be considered is the width of the street; also, the width of the sidewalk or nearness of the houses. Some trees, the Elm for instance, will injure the foundation...
-Selection Of Spectes. Part 2
The Sweet Gum, or Liquidambar, so named from the fragrant balsam which exudes when the trunk is wounded, is an ornamental tree of about eighty feet in height and two feet in diameter, attaining in som...
-Selection Of Spectes. Part 3
The Common or Yellow Locust is one of our most beautiful trees on account of its profusion of pinnate leaves, and the pendant racemes of white flowers which in June fill the air with an agreeable perf...
-Selection Of Spectes. Part 4
For narrow streets, or where there is little space between the house line and the curbstone, the Japanese Ginkgo is well adapted, as it docs not attain a wide spread. When fully grown it is over sixty...
-Undesirable Species
Some trees are omitted, not so much on account of doubtful qualities but because the list already offers ample opportunity for selection from the large number named. There are, doubtless, several othe...
-Destructive Insects
Objection will probably be made to some of the species named because of their liability to injury from destructive insects. But if all such trees are to be thrown out. the choice will be narrowed down...
-Rapidity Of Growth
Trees have been described here as of rapid growth and slow growth. These are largely relative terms which, to some people, may convey but little meaning. They will be better understood when the growth...
-Transplanting
In digging up a young tree the roots should be preserved as far as practicable, the circular trench being at least six feet in diameter, or three feet from the stem in all directions. Any unnecessary ...
-Praning
As trees grow larger and older they require pruning occasionally to remove dead limbs, to improve their shape, and. in the ease of very old trees, to restore them to vigor. This work should not be ent...
-Arrangement Of Trees On Streets
In street planting the trees should be placed with reference to the room they will need when telly grown, rather than with reference to the lot boundaries; otherwise, there will be irregularity, overc...
-Protection Of Trees
In towns and cities the trunk of every tree, whether young or old, newly planted or of full growth, should be enclosed to a proper height in wire netting of a small mesh. Unless this is done, or some ...
-Protection From Insects
Protection from insects requires constant care and watchfulness. As the householder, generally, has only a few trees to look alter, he can, with proper cut- and diligence, effectually check any insect...
-Municipal Control
In towns where there are no well-organized tree-planting or village improvement societies the planting of street trees and their subsequent care should devolve on the city or village government, prefe...
-Legislation. Massachusetts
John Evelyn said that men seldom plant trees till they begin to be wise; and so it may be well to note what the wise men in the Legislatures of various States have decreed as to tree planting on stree...
-Legislation. Connecticut
Chap. 244, Laws 1902. Bounty Every person planting, protecting and cultivating elm, maple, tulip, ash, basswood, oak, black walnut, hickory, apple, pear, or cherry trees not more than sixty feet...
-Legislation. Pennsylvania
Chap. -275 Laws 1901. Sec. 1. The burgess and council of any borough upon petition of a majority of the property owners on any public street may by ordinance require the planting of shade trees, and o...
-Legislation. New Jersey
Chap. 285, Laws 1893. Sec. 1. Provides that there may be appointed in all municipalities a Commission of three freeholders without compensation, who shall have control and power to plant and care for ...
-Legislation. Ohio
Statutes. Sec. 2307. Provides that upon petition of more than two-thirds of the ownership in feet on streets of cities of the second class and villages the council may provide by ordinance for plantin...
-Legislation. Minnesota
Chap. 243, Laws 1895. Sec. 2. The Park Commissioners of each city are empowered to regulate the planting and preservation of shade trees in the streets and public grounds. No shade tree shall be destr...
-Legislation. California
Chap. 140, Laws 1893. Sec. 1. All public streets may be planted with shade trees along the sidewalks by order of the City Councils. Sec. 2. Provides method of procedure in passing resolution for pl...
-Legislation. Florida
Chap. 74, Laws 1901. Sec. 1. Hie County Commissioners are empowered to improve by shading the public roads and highways of their respective counties. Sec. J. It is the duty of said Commissioners up...
-Autumn Foliage
In the selection of species for street and highway planting some consideration should be given to the colors which the leaves will display in the fall months, a matter as important as that of tree hab...
-Prevailing Colors
Pure Yellow. Tulip Tree, Yellow and Canoe Birches, White Maple, Yellow Locust, Honey Locust, Yellow Wood. Norway and Sycamore Maples, Beech, Wallow, Cucumber, Ailanthus. Yellow Ochre. Larch, Poplar...
-Prevailing Colors. Part 2
It must be remembered, also, that these color effects are far more brilliant and impressive when observed on a bright, sunny day and in a dry, clear atmosphere; and that the autumn foliage loses much ...
-Prevailing Colors. Part 3
An English writer. Mr. Alfred Russell Wallace, notes that chlorophyll is not a simple green pigment, but that it really consists of at least seven distinct substances, varying in color horn blue to ye...
-Influence Of Frost
There is a popular impression that the autumnal change of leaf color is due to the action of frost: and that early frosts conduce to a more vivid tinting of the foliage. This, however, is an error tha...
-Common And Botanical Names Of Trees Mentioned In This Article
So much contusion exists in the use of the common names of our trees that it may be well to append here a list of the species mentioned in the foregoing pages, with the botanical name of each for the ...








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